Procedures - Endodontic Retreatment

With the appropriate care, your teeth that have had endodontic treatment will last as long as other natural teeth. Yet, a tooth that has received treatment may fail to heal or pain may continue to exist. Sometimes, the pain may occur months or years after treatment. If so, Endodontic Retreatment may be needed.

Improper healing may be caused by:

  • Small or calcified canals that were undetected during the initial treatment.
  • Complicated canals went undetected during the initial treatment.
  • The crown or restoration was not placed within the appropriate amount of time following the procedure allowing for reinfection of the root canal system.
  • The crown or restoration did not prevent bacteria from contaminating the inside of the tooth.

In some cases, new problems can influence a tooth that was successfully treated:

  • New decay can expose a root canal filling material, causing reinfection.
  • A cracked or loose filling or crown can expose the tooth to new infection.

Once retreatment has been prescribed, your tooth will be reopened to gain access to the root canal filling material. This material will be removed to access the root canal. The canals will then be cleaned, shaped and disinfected. The doctor will then carefully examine the inside of the problematic tooth and remove bacteria. Once cleaned, he will fill and seal the canals and place a temporary filling in the tooth.

At this point, you will need to return to your dentist as soon as possible in order to have a new crown or restoration placed on the tooth to restore full functionality.

What causes an endodontically treated tooth to need additional treatment?

New trauma, deep decay, or a loose, cracked or broken filling can cause new infection in your tooth. In some cases, the endodontist may discover additional very narrow or curved canals that could not be treated during the initial procedure.

Can all teeth be treated endodontically?

Most teeth can be treated. Occasionally, a tooth canít be saved because the root canals are not accessible, the root is severely fractured, the tooth doesnít have adequate bone support, or the tooth cannot be restored. However, advances in endodontics are making it possible to save teeth that even a few years ago would have been lost. When endodontic treatment is not effective, an endodontic surgery called an Apicoectomy may be able to save the tooth.


Disclaimer Notice This website is provided for information and educational purposes only. A doctor/patient relationship has not been established by your use of this site. A diagnosis or treatment has not been provided by this site. The information provided on this site should be used along with your consultations with your endodontist. There are no guarantees or warrantees regarding the information proficed on this website. This website is not intended to offer specific medical, dental, or surgical advice to anyone.